Progress Report

Program Compliance

Program Compliance Tables

Last updated: 05/2018

Related Figures

Acid Rain Program SO₂ Program Allowance Reconciliation Summary, 2016
Cross-State Air Pollution Rule SO₂ Group 1 Program Allowance Reconciliation Summary, 2016
Cross-State Air Pollution Rule SO₂ Group 2 Program Allowance Reconciliation Summary, 2016
Cross-State Air Pollution Rule NOₓ Annual Program Allowance Reconciliation Summary, 2016
Cross-State Air Pollution Rule NOₓ Ozone Season Program Allowance Reconciliation Summary, 2016

Highlights

ARP SO₂ Programs

  • The reported 2016 SO₂ emissions by ARP sources totaled 1,469,779 tons.
  • Almost 42 million SO₂ allowances were available for compliance (9 million vintage 2016 and nearly 33 million banked from prior years).
  • EPA deducted just under 1.5 million allowances for ARP compliance. After reconciliation, over 40.2 million ARP SO₂ allowances were banked and carried forward to the 2017 ARP compliance year.
  • All ARP SO₂ facilities were in compliance in 2016 (holding sufficient allowances to cover their SO₂ emissions).

CSAPR SO₂ Group 1 Program

  • The reported 2016 SO₂ emissions by CSAPR Group 1 sources totaled 785,248 tons.
  • Over 3.7 million SO₂ Group 1 allowances were available for compliance.
  • EPA deducted just over 785,000 million allowances for CSAPR SO₂ Group 1 compliance. After reconciliation, over 2.9 million CSAPR SO₂ Group 1 allowances were banked and carried forward to the 2017 compliance year.
  • All CSAPR SO₂ Group 1 facilities were in compliance in 2016 (holding sufficient allowances to cover their SO₂ emissions).

CSAPR SO₂ Group 2 Program

  • The reported 2016 SO₂ emissions by CSAPR Group 2 sources totaled 371,723 tons.
  • Over 1.3 million SO₂ Group 2 allowances were available for compliance.
  • EPA deducted just over 371,000 allowances for CSAPR SO₂ Group 2 compliance. After reconciliation, over 961,000 CSAPR SO₂ Group 2 allowances were banked and carried forward to the 2017 compliance year.
  • All CSAPR SO₂ Group 2 facilities were in compliance in 2016 (holding sufficient allowances to cover their SO₂ emissions).

CSAPR NOₓ Annual Program

  • The reported 2016 annual NOₓ emissions by CSAPR sources totaled 801,872 tons.
  • Just over 1.6 million NOₓ Annual allowances were available for compliance.
  • EPA deducted just over 801,000 allowances for CSAPR NOₓ Annual compliance. After reconciliation, over 802,000 CSAPR NOₓ Annual allowances were banked and carried forward to the 2017 compliance year.
  • All CSAPR NOₓ Annual facilities were in compliance with the CSAPR NOₓ Annual program (holding sufficient allowances to cover their NOₓ emissions).

CSAPR NOₓ Ozone Season Program

  • The reported 2016 ozone season NOₓ emissions by CSAPR sources totaled 422,361 tons.
  • Just over 777,000 NOₓ ozone season allowances were available for compliance.
  • EPA deducted just over 422,000 allowances for CSAPR NOₓ Ozone Season compliance. After reconciliation, almost 354,000 CSAPR NOₓ Ozone Season allowances were banked. These banked allowances were converted to CSAPR NOₓ ozone season group 1 and group 2 allowances under the CSAPR Update Rule. Banked allowances held in Georgia facility accounts were converted at 1 for 1 to CSAPR NOₓ ozone season group 1 allowances. All other banked allowances were converted at a ratio of 3.278 to 1 to vintage 2017 CSAPR NOₓ ozone season group 2 allowances. The conversion resulted in 100,134 year 2017 CSAPR NOₓ ozone season group 2 allowances, and 18,513 CSAPR NOₓ ozone season group 1 allowances.
  • Two facilities were out of compliance with the CSAPR NOₓ Ozone Season program and had 17 total tons of excess emissions.

Analysis and Background Information

The year 2016 was the second year of compliance for the CSAPR SO₂ (Group 1 and Group 2), annual NOₓ and ozone season NOₓ programs. Each program has its own distinct set of allowances, which cannot be used for compliance with the other programs (e.g., CSAPR SO₂ Group 1 allowances cannot be used to comply with the CSAPR SO₂ Group 2 Program).

The compliance summary emissions number cited in “Highlights” may differ slightly from the sums of emissions used for reconciliation purposes shown in the “Allowance Reconciliation Summary” figures because of variation in rounding conventions, changes due to resubmissions by sources, and compliance issues at certain units. Therefore, the allowance totals deducted for actual emissions in those figures differ slightly from the number of emissions shown elsewhere in this report.